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Women's Ministries Logo

 

 

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Introduction
We hope that this information will help you understand our Women's Ministries logo and its use. Some recent changes have been made to our logo. We also feel that it would be good for you to know a little of the history of our logo and to have guidelines for use so we can maintain the integrity of our logo and ensure that it is easily identifiable by all who come in contact with it.
 
We appreciate your helping us in implementing the guidelines given and ensuring that we maintain one standard for use of this logo.
 
Description and Explanation
The logo depicts four women of varying ethnic backgrounds. These women represent not only the inclusiveness of Women's Ministries but also represent some of the objectives of Women's Ministries.
  • It represents women of all ages.
  • It represents women of different ethnic origins.
  • It represents women working together.
  • It represents women with a book. It may be a Bible, representing spiritual growth. The women may be learning for themselves or teaching others. It may be a literacy book. It may be that the women are studying leadership or mentoring other woman. Or it may be a book on any of the other areas of interest to women, but women are growing and sharing.
  • It represents women supporting and caring for each other; together they represent an important part of the church, and together they can make a difference.
History of the Women's Ministries Logo
Soon after Women's Ministries began in 1990, it was obvious that there was a need for a logo—a symbol, a statement about Women's Ministries—something that would say something without words or need of translation.
 
Rose Otis, director of Women's Ministries, worked with Jeff Dever, of Dever Designs, an award-winning Adventist designer near the General Conference, to come up with such an image. As Women's Ministries began around the globe, the logo began to become familiar and identified the office (Women's Ministries did not become a department until 1995).
 
When it was voted to celebrate 1995 as the "Year of the Adventist Woman," it was decided that the logo should be adapted to help the Church understand better who and what the Adventist woman is. Again, Jeff Dever, Rose Otis, and this time, Ardis Stenbakken, worked on the project. The logo was not changed, but this time words were added.
 
The logo appeared in two forms: one with a motto and one without. The motto, "An Affirmation of Women and Mission", and the logo were widely used; a poster was produced featuring women from all parts of the world and the motto was translated into the appropriate languages to go with the logo.
 
As the logo continued to be used, it was reproduced on banners, posters, floats, signs and printed materials—sometimes copies of originals, and sometimes copies of copies of copies, and sometimes free hand. The logo took on different features and sizes and shapes. Complaints began to come to the General Conference of Women's Ministries that some groups of women felt left out, smaller, behind: not as important as the other women. Because the purpose of the logo was to show the equality of women, women working, learning, and growing together, these complaints were taken seriously.
 
At the second Women's Ministries World Advisory, held in March, 2001, the division directors and the General Conference departmental directors took a sizeable chunk of time to discuss and work on the logo. Ideas were sent back to Jeff Dever for advice and guidance. The women felt that they did not want to lose the idea and identification of the logo, which had by now become well recognized, but they also wanted to do something to meet the needs of all the women. After considerable discussion and drafts, the logo was changed slightly. The idea was voted and accepted and Jeff Dever was asked to finalize the art work and put it on electronic formats so that everyone could have a uniform image.
 
At the Women's Ministries World Advisory, held in March 2016, the General Conference directors presented a newly revised logo to the division directors. The difference from the 2001 logo is the inclusion of a second eye for each of the four silhouette faces. This logo was voted and accepted, and all the directors received digital images of the new 2016 logo. It is also available in the Women's Ministries colors, PMS 320 (aqua) and PMS 273 (purple).
 
Logo Use
The logo is only to be used to identify the Women's Ministries Department of the Seventh-day Adventist Church.
 
It is to be used in it's entirety with no parts removed or added, e.g. adding another woman to the logo, is discouraged. It should only be used with the given scale so as not to distort the figures.
 
While the logo may be enlarged, it should not be reduced to a size beyond recognition or where features are lost.
 
Adding a Name
The logo should be used as produced by this department. A division, union, conference/mission or local church can add their name to the logo. However, when reprinting material from the General Conference the local field cannot add their logo or name to the WM logo.
 
Official/Alternate Colors
The official colors of the logo are PMS 320 (aqua) and PMS 273 (purple) and black can also be used. When using any of these colors they should be solid colors. More than one of the official colors cannot be used at the same time in the logo.
It should also be noted that reverse print is allowed when using the logo.
 
Possible Uses
The logo can be used on—
  • letterheads
  • envelopes
  • fax cover sheets
  • signs
  • calling cards
  • posters
  • invitations
  • brochures
  • seminars
  • backdrops
  • banners
  • program bulletins, etc.
But it can only be used in relation to Women's Ministries.